Iceland Travel Guide

Iceland Hotels

Iceland Travel Destination
Reykjavik, Iceland
Keflavik, Iceland
Akureyri, Iceland
Egilstadir, Iceland
Hallormsstadur, Iceland
Hella, Iceland
Hofn, Iceland
Husavik, Iceland
Kirkjubajarklaustur, Iceland
Myvatn, Iceland
Reydarfjordur, Iceland
Selfoss, Iceland
Vik, Iceland

Iceland Tourism:
Reykjavik Tourism
Myvatn Tourism

Iceland Directory & Iceland Travel Information

Iceland Topography
Iceland Geography
Iceland Geological Activity
Iceland Climate
Iceland Flora & Fauna
Iceland Demographics
Iceland Government
Iceland Subdivisions
Politics of Iceland
Iceland Foreign Relations
Iceland Most Populous Towns
Iceland Languages
Iceland Religion
Iceland Economy & Infrastructure
Iceland 2008-2009 Economic Crisis
Iceland Transport
Iceland Renewal Energy
Iceland Education & Science
Iceland Culture
Iceland Literature & The Arts
Iceland Music
Iceland Media & Cinema
Iceland Cuisine
Iceland Sports

Iceland History:
Settlement & The Establishment of the Commonwealth
Middle Ages to the Early Modern Era of Iceland
Independence & Recent History

Iceland Vacation Trips

Iceland Holiday Vacation Trips offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


Iceland Literature and Arts

Iceland's best-known classical works of literature are the Icelanders' sagas, prose epics set in Iceland's age of settlement. The most famous of these include Njáls saga, about an epic blood feud, and Grœnlendinga saga and Eiríks saga, describing the discovery and settlement of Greenland and Vinland. Egils saga, Laxdæla saga, Grettis saga, Gísla saga and Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu are also notable and popular Icelanders' sagas.

A translation of the Bible was published in the 16th century. Important compositions since the 15th to the 19th century include sacred verse, most famously the Passion Hymns of Hallgrímur Pétursson, and rímur, rhyming epic poems. Originating in the 14th century, rímur were popular into the 19th century, when the development of new literary forms was provoked by the influential, National-Romantic writer Jónas Hallgrímsson. In recent times, Iceland has produced many great writers, the best-known of which is arguably Halldór Laxness who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955. Steinn Steinarr was an influential modernist poet.

The distinctive rendition of the Icelandic landscape by its painters can be linked to nationalism and the movement to home rule and independence, which was very active in this period.

Contemporary Icelandic painting is typically traced to the work of Þórarinn Þorláksson, who, following formal training in art in the 1890s in Copenhagen, returned to Iceland to paint and exhibit works from 1900 to his death in 1924, almost exclusively portraying the Icelandic landscape. Several other Icelandic men and women artists learned in Denmark Academy at that time, including Ásgrímur Jónsson, who together with Þórarinn created a distinctive portrayal of Iceland's landscape in a romantic naturalistic style. Other landscape artists quickly followed in the footsteps of Þórarinn and Ásgrímur. These included Jóhannes Kjarval and Júlíana Sveinsdóttir. Kjarval in particular is noted for the distinct techniques in the application of paint that he developed in a concerted effort to render the characteristic volcanic rock that dominates the Icelandic environment.

Einar Hákonarson is an expressionistic and figurative painter who by some is considered to have brought the figure back into Icelandic painting. In the 1980s many Icelandic artists worked with the subject of the new painting in their work.

In the recent years artistic practice has multiplied, and the Icelandic art scene has become a setting for many large scale projects and exhibitions. The artist run gallery space Kling og Bang, members of which later ran the studio complex and exhibition venue Klink og Bank has been a significant portion of the trend of self organised spaces, exhibitions and projects. The Living Art Museum, Reykjavik Municipal Art Museum and the National Gallery of Iceland are the larger, more established institutions, curating shows and festivals, with a growing amount of variety from year to year.

Icelandic architecture draws from Scandinavian influences. The scarcity of native trees resulted in traditional houses being covered by grass and turf.


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Iceland Travel Destination

Iceland Travel Informations and Iceland Travel Guide
Topography of Iceland - Geography of Iceland - Iceland Geological Activity - Iceland Climate
Flora & Fauna of Iceland - Demographics of Iceland

Iceland History : Settlement & The Establishment of the Commonwealth
Middle Ages to the Early Modern Era of Iceland - Independence & Recent History

Government of Iceland - Iceland Subdivisions - Politics of Iceland - Iceland Foreign Relations
Most Populous Towns in Iceland - Languages in Iceland - Religion in Iceland - Economy & Infrastructure
2008-2009 economic crisis - Transport of Iceland - Renewal Energy of Iceland - Education & Science of Iceland
Culture of Iceland - Iceland Literature & The Arts - Music of Iceland - Media & Cinema of Iceland
Cuisine of Iceland - Sports in Iceland

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